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10 Good Things to Remember About the Unborn Even if They are Aborted

10 Good Things to Remember About the Unborn Even if They are Aborted

Catholic Free Press

One, unborn children have souls created by God immediately out of nothing. Although the body can be dismembered, burned, or thrown out as landfill, the soul cannot be divided, changed, or destroyed. Two, their souls are everlasting because God wants them to be happy with Him forever. Three, we can ask those souls to pray for an end to the greed and violence that sent them, as innocent and unwanted victims, away from this world.

Four, we should not worry about limbo. We are not a people of presumption; we are a people of prayer, faith, and hope. If we are blessed to be with God for all eternity, we can have certain faith that in His infinite wisdom, mercy, and love there is absolutely no chance that we will find anything unhappy, unjust, or unloving in Heaven.

Five, like all children, each unborn child killed by abortion has a guardian angel, part of a vast army of good and powerful spirits doing God’s work. Six, we can ask these angels to fight the demons that surround abortion clinics, to illuminate the minds of confused mothers, and to open the eyes of the people who kill children for profit.

Seven, like all women, the mothers who are led to abortion by the lies and temptations of demons also have guardian angels. Eight, we can ask our guardian angels to assist the guardian angels of desperate women wherever they are, to guide and inspire them, even if it is too late to save the life of the unborn child. We can pray for the souls of all the mothers who ever have, or ever will, abort their children, for we pray to an all-merciful, all-powerful, all-loving God who holds everything in existence and can forgive the greatest of sins.

Nine, we can fight against this evil anytime and anywhere with prayer. We can ask all the angels, saints, and our Our Lady, the Queen of Angels and Saints, to pray that God the Father will rebuke this evil, that Jesus Christ who is God the Son Incarnate will lead all souls to Heaven especially those in most need of His mercy, and that God the Holy Spirit will open the hearts and minds of the lost so that they may behold all that is good, beautiful, and true. If we knew what a single prayer can do, maybe we would pray without ceasing. Ten, we are on the side that already wins, that cannot lose, that will be victorious. We, adopted and faithful children of God Almighty, can never forget that.

—–

For our wrestling is not against flesh and blood; but against principalities and powers, against the rulers of the world of this darkness, against the spirits of wickedness in the high places. Therefore, take unto you the armour of God, that you may be able to resist in the evil day and to stand in all things perfect.” Ephesians 6:12-13

About the Author

About the Author: Hello, and thank you for reading. I am a wife, mother of seven, and joyful convert to Catholicism. I write from my tiny office in a 100-year-old restored Adirondack mountain lodge that overlooks a spring-fed lake. Read more about me here, with pictures. Find me on Facebook, follow me on Twitter, or contact me by email. God bless you! .

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  • http://momandthensome.blogspot.com Nicole C

    Brilliant, Stacy. As usual! Something I needed to hear today, for MANY reasons.

  • John Darrouzet

    Excellent good things to remember!

  • Pingback: 10 Good Things to Remember About the Unborn Even if They are Aborted | CATHOLIC FEAST

  • Steve T.

    I’ve long thought that one of the worst jobs in all eternity is to be the guardian angel of a baby being aborted. “See that you despise not one of these little ones: for I say to you, that their angels in heaven always see the face of my Father who is in heaven. (Mt 18:10)” I can’t imagine what it would be like to see the most sublime sight in all of time and eternity while simultaneously watching one of the worst sights in all of time and eternity, and being helpless to prevent it.

    • http://www.acceptingabundance.com Stacy Trasancos

      Me neither. What I’m reading about angels, Peter Kreeft mostly for now, and he says they are so far beyond our intelligence that we cannot understand it. They *know* a concept in its entirety all at once, but yeah, that is a terrible thing to imagine – being the guardian of an innocent baby and unable to stop its violent death.

  • Mary Ann T.

    What an absolutely inspiring way to see the abortion issue. So often we feel overwhelmed with how bad things are getting, how de-valued life is becoming. The unborn themselves, along with their guardian angels, are a powerful means we have to intercede to God, and to give us spiritual strength. Thank you for a brilliant perspective!

    • http://www.acceptingabundance.com Stacy Trasancos

      Mary Ann, like so many other people, it comes after a lot of despair and tears, and finally realizing that evil will never end until the world ends. I hate abortion.

  • Mjeck
    • http://www.acceptingabundance.com Stacy Trasancos

      Someone beat you to it and emailed me the link already. The Catholic hospital should have acted Catholic and affirmed the humanity of those children. You have to understand, there are lots of people who call themselves Catholic, but deny the Church’s teaching. It’s part of that free will thing.

      What would someone not Catholic have to say about this anyway? The defense is abiding by laws Catholics oppose. Are you implying that you think RvW is nonsense? That the unborn is a person? That the hospital should treat the little twins as people who mattered?

      Because if you are, then you the same as a faithful Catholic.

      If not, then you are the same as the defense attorneys in that article.

    • Mjeck

      I was hoping you’d comment on what obligations and responsibilities that Catholic Hospitals have to the Catholic Church;

      This may have set/proven a precedent; i.e. that Catholic’s are not exempt from providing contraceptive;

      Catholic churches and hospitals seem to mitigate their damages, even when it is against their own beliefs.

    • ChrisCintheD

      Hi Stacy,

      I emailed you the link because I didn’t want to hijack this topic. I was hoping maybe it would become its own topic, or we could have continued this conversation on the side. So much for that ^_^

      As I mentioned when I emailed this to you, it was my Catholic friends who were deeply troubled by this. I’m not surprised by it at all, but they are and are deeply hurt by it. This issue is really shaking those that see themselves as “real” Catholics.

      What I find puzzling is a lack of outcry from local bishops and cardinals about this case. This is counter to Catholic teaching, so why are they so mum about it? The Church has a PR problem, and staying quiet on this cannot and will not help.

      How do you think this will impact people looking to join the Church? People who lost faith in the administration of the Church, as I did, after the pedophilia scandal?

      I asked your honest opinion on this, because I see some people I really care about who are REALLY struggling with this. While I am not a member of the Church any longer, I am still concerned by the decisions it makes…because those decisions impact those that I care about.

      I know you feel that people who would make decision like this are not “real” Catholics, but the decisions these “fake” Catholics make impact real people. From the pregnant woman that lost her life in Ireland to the loss of this mother and her twins…these people faced real consequences due to the actions and ideologies of “fake” Catholics.

  • Melinda

    Uplifting words, Stacy! I read your post about angels the other day and decided to read the P. Kreeft book too. It’s great.

    • http://www.acceptingabundance.com Stacy Trasancos

      Thank you for letting me know, Melinda. I was surprised at how easy it was to read. I’ll never watch superhero movies the same way again.

  • http://www.acceptingabundance.com Stacy Trasancos

    Mjeck,

    “I was hoping you’d comment on what obligations and responsibilities that Catholic Hospitals have to the Catholic Church…”

    I did. I said there are people who call themselves Catholic, but reject the Church’s teaching.

    The precedent this would have set is not about contraception, that has nothing to do with this story. It was a chance to affirm the humanity of the unborn, conform to a higher law, than conform to man’s flawed laws.

    “Catholic churches and hospitals seem to mitigate their damages, even when it is against their own beliefs.”

    The Church does not. Individuals and individual institutions do.

    What I’d like to know is this: Where’s the same outrage over Nanci Pelosi, Joe Biden, or any of the members of “Catholics for Choice?” No one who thinks that the unborn are just fetuses and not children or people has any leg to stand on in criticizing this hospital. They are following the laws the same laws you would follow.

    Can you comment on that? I find it incredibly disingenuous.

    • Mjeck

      Stacy,

      I’m not trying to trap you, i’m asking an honest question because I don’t know;

      to rephrase:

      Are Catholic hospitals in no way related, affiliated or responsible to the Catholic Church?

      Can each Catholic hospital individually decide how to proceed, independent of the Catholic Church?

      The Catholic church has mitigated its damages, regarding child abuse, in court; that is a whole different discussion; I am seeing the same thing in this case.

    • http://www.acceptingabundance.com Stacy Trasancos

      Mjeck,

      It’s a complicated question because, in the past when they first started, yes, the local diocese ran the hospital. Employees were bound to Catholic ethics.

      These hospitals were very successful. The quality of care was excellent. They did more to treat the poor than public hospitals could possibly do. Over time, they grew.

      They grew so big that almost all (to my knowledge it is ALL) of them partnered with private financial entities to survive. The Catholic name had brand recognition, if you will, so the St. So and So names stayed on them.

      As the years went by, professionals worked in these hospitals who were not Catholic. Private doctors and professionals opened offices or obtained privileges to practice in these hospitals. The people employed directly by the hospital were, in contract, bound by Catholic ethics. The ones renting space were not. The lines became blurred. Bishops were unable to monitor everything that goes on (see my writing about Bishops and OB/GYN offices, eh, they don’t exactly frequent them).

      In the case of this CO hospital, it’s not just a hospital. It’s the second largest religious provider, a conglomerate, in the nation.

      (Some hospitals also dropped the Catholic name altogether, or mixed it. The hospital here in NY is called “Faxton St. Luke” and there is no mention of Catholicism anywhere now. The Church no longer plays any role, but the St. name remains as part of the whole name.)

      So, to answer your question. Yes, they are supposed to be run by the diocese, but no, the bishops have very little control over what the hospitals actually do now.

      Think about it. What do they do? Go shut down the hospital? Withdraw completely and stop trying to make things better? (Some have, many more will under Obamacare.)

      In this case in CO, I suspect that the most the Bishop can do is to assert Catholic teaching and urge the defense lawyer (who may not even be Catholic) to comply. He cannot force the issue. He could pull the Eucharist out of that hospital and denounce it as Catholic, but again, is this really the best answer? That’s what the bishops have to deal with.

      “Can each Catholic hospital individually decide how to proceed, independent of the Catholic Church?”

      Yes, but the bishop can revoke Catholic identity if he chooses. This is what Bishop Olmstead did in Arizona last year.

      The ambiguity of Catholic hospitals and Catholic ethics is nothing new to Catholics like me who are saddened that the ethical standards are compromised. Believe me, I fought it in MA. I saw first hand that there is no simple solution. If you shut down a hospital because a few doctors aren’t complying, you do more harm to the community than good. In MA there had been a good faith contract between the private entity and the diocese, but the private entity violated it. The diocese asked for no money from the deal, they just agreed to leave the St. name and Catholic services in the hospital. They were, in essence, being taken advantage of. In the coming years, you are going to see a lot of Catholic hospitals be forced to revoke the Catholic identity. And that’s sad. That identity is what made them successful in the first place.

    • Mjeck

      Thanks Stacy, that was well informed and interesting to read. I now understand and respect your disappointment.

      Business should never take over charity and good will; the result is never charitable, nor in good will

    • http://www.acceptingabundance.com Stacy Trasancos

      Mjeck,

      Thanks for reading all of that. I have motor-mouth on this subject.

  • http://www.acceptingabundance.com Stacy Trasancos

    Chris,

    Hi! I was planning to respond later today. I am launching a new website with ~48 other people today, and the server stopped working. Sigh. Thank you for the link though. I didn’t want to respond without thinking it through and trying to see where the journalists were coming from.

    “As I mentioned when I emailed this to you, it was my Catholic friends who were deeply troubled by this. I’m not surprised by it at all, but they are and are deeply hurt by it. This issue is really shaking those that see themselves as “real” Catholics.”

    To those people, I’d ask, “Is your faith in the Church, or in people to follow the Church?” The Church is not advising the defense or this hospital to declare the unborn un-people. The malpractice insurers and defense are doing that. They are arguing that since under the law the unborn are not people, the law cannot sue them for otherwise. I don’t like this tactic, but that’s what they are doing.

    “What I find puzzling is a lack of outcry from local bishops and cardinals about this case. This is counter to Catholic teaching, so why are they so mum about it? The Church has a PR problem, and staying quiet on this cannot and will not help.”

    Chris, you are reading liberal media. What did you expect? You don’t know what the local diocese is doing. They didn’t speak publicly and I don’t blame them because then it is devoured by anti-Catholic media sources and turned into a circus. If they did make a public outcry, those media sources would just attack them for that. It doesn’t mean they aren’t making an outcry to the people who are actually involved (as opposed to spectating).

    “How do you think this will impact people looking to join the Church? People who lost faith in the administration of the Church, as I did, after the pedophilia scandal?”

    It’s called scandal.

    Scandal: Discredit to religion occasioned by the conduct of a religious person; conduct, on the part of a religious person, which brings discredit on religion. Also, perplexity of conscience occasioned by the conduct of one who is looked up to as an example. (OED)

    This isn’t “The Church” causing scandal, it’s the people rejecting the Church who are causing it. They lead people astray.

    “Do you think the Church is doing enough to combat these fake Catholics? What should be done moving forward to prevent these things from happening in the future?”

    That is a very good question, and the heart of it. For all her history, there have been people who caused scandal like this. It is nothing new, even one of Christ’s apostles turned him over to authorities for money.

    There was a time when civil authorities even burned people at the stake if the Church accused them of heresy. However, it is a major tenet of Catholicism that people cannot be forced to have faith or accept teaching, so the most the Church will do is publicly acknowledge that dissenters have excommunicated themselves. Could they do this more? I don’t know. It’s a matter for local bishops to decide because they have the facts. If there’s hope for reconciliation, they are probably hesitant to make a public statement against an individual, but never regarding truth. The Church would not change its teaching over a court case gone awry. Your friends need to reminded to lay blame where it is due — with the people doing this and not the Church.

    Personally, having lived in one of the most liberal states in the nation, I can testify that I’ve never been in a single Catholic hospital that actually followed Church teaching on issues related to the beginning of life. I’ve been strongly pressured under the roof of a hospital bearing the name of a a most charitable saint to abort one of our daughters. This Catholic hospital thing has been festering for a long time, they are tied up with non-Catholic investors and the integrity of their ethics has been compromised. This case is a perfect example.

    IF everyone involved had followed Church teaching, there certainly would have been a more compassionate and possibly life-affirming outcome.

    • ChrisCintheD

      >>This Catholic hospital thing has been festering for a long time, they are tied up with non-Catholic investors and the integrity of their ethics has been compromised. This case is a perfect example.<<

      Hopefully, this incident will help things to change.

      I really hope this issue is investigated to the nth degree, because there was some major negligence going on and the parties involved need to be held responsible.

  • The Ordinary Catholic

    As a Catholic, I knew all these things that you mentioned in your post but when we become involved in passionately defending the unborn and fighting against abortion, we at times forget what we can do and what the reality is, and a reminder such as this is a good thing. I’ve read several Kreeft books and I’ve never been disappointed by them. He has a way of explaining things that just boggles my mind and it is done in an easy to understand way. Not always however I’ll grant you, but sometimes rereading a paragraph will send me on my way again. Thanks for the reminder Stacy.

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